The Role of Patient and Parental Resilience in Adolescents with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the level of resilience among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and their parents and to determine factors associated with patient and parental resilience.

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study of children aged 13-17 years diagnosed with chronic musculoskeletal pain and their parents. Patient-parent pairs were seen for initial consultation in the pediatric rheumatology pain clinic at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between March and May 2018 and were administered a series of questionnaires including measures of resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale 10 item, The 14-item Resilience Scale, and the 7Cs of Resilience Tool). We calculated Pearson correlation coefficients to examine the relationship between the variables of interest and resilience.

RESULTS: According to all resilience measures, patients and parents had low to moderate levels of resilience. These levels were lower than those previously reported among healthy populations, as well as those with chronic medical conditions. According to the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale 10 item, patient-level resilience was negatively correlated with pain level (r = -0.48), physical disability (r = -0.54), and symptom severity (r = -0.53). The level of resilience among patients was positively correlated with energy level (r = 0.57) and health-related quality of life (r = 0.64). Parental resilience was positively correlated with parental mental health (r = 0.61).

CONCLUSIONS: Higher patient resilience was correlated with reduced disease severity among adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Future research should explore whether fostering resilience in adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain via the application of resilience-training interventions mitigates disease burden in this vulnerable patient population.

Authors:

Gmuca S, Xiao R, Urquhart A, Weiss PF, Gillham JE, Ginsburg KR, Sherry DD, Gerber JS