Description and Evaluation of an Educational Intervention on Health Care Costs and Value

OBJECTIVE: There is growing consensus that to ensure that health care dollars are spent efficiently, physicians need more training in how to provide high-value, cost-conscious care. Thus, in fiscal year 2014, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia piloted a 9-part curriculum on health care costs and value for faculty in the Division of General Pediatrics. This study uses baseline and postintervention surveys to gauge knowledge, perceptions, and views on these issues and to assess the efficacy of the pilot curriculum.

METHODS: Faculty completed surveys about their knowledge and perceptions about health care costs and value and their views on the role physicians should play in containing costs and promoting value. Baseline and postintervention responses were compared and analyzed on the basis of how many of the sessions respondents attended.

RESULTS: Sixty-two faculty members completed the baseline survey (71% response rate), and 45 faculty members completed the postintervention survey (63% response rate). Reported knowledge of health care costs and value increased significantly in the postintervention survey (P = .04 and P < .001). Odds of being knowledgeable about costs and value were 2.42 (confidence interval: 1.05–5.58) and 6.22 times greater (confidence interval: 2.29–16.90), respectively, postintervention. Reported knowledge of health care costs and value increased with number of sessions attended (P = .01 and P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS: The pilot curriculum appeared to successfully introduce physicians to concepts around health care costs and value and initiated important discussions about the role physicians can play in containing costs and promoting value. Additional education, increased cost transparency, and more decision support tools are needed to help physicians translate knowledge into practice.

Authors

Jonas JA, Ronan JC, Petrie I, Fieldston ES